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Former Agriculture Secretaries Announce Support for USMCA

All former U.S. Secretaries of Agriculture since President Reagan’s Administration announced support for the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). In a letter to Congressional leaders, former Secretaries John Block (Reagan), Mike Espy (Clinton), Dan Glickman (Clinton), Ann Veneman (W. Bush), Mike Johanns (W. Bush), Ed Shafer (W. Bush), and Tom Vilsack (Obama) underscored the importance of passing USMCA saying, “We need a strong and reliable trade deal with our top two customers for U.S. agriculture products. USMCA will provide certainty in the North American market for the U.S. farm sector and rural economy. We strongly support ratification of USMCA.” Following the announcement, Secretary Perdue issued this statement:

“President Trump has fulfilled a promise, which many said couldn’t be done, to renegotiate NAFTA and improve the standing of the entire American economy, including...

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Sep 20 8:17 AM, General News



Rabobank: Poultry Q4 2019 Outlook 

Global poultry markets are expected to see some recovery in the coming months. However, this will be under fragile conditions. Key concerns are the ongoing oversupply situations in many global markets, like the EU, US and South Africa. Actually, only disease-affected China and Mexico, and Brazil (due to the combination of supply reduction and improved export demand), are performing relatively well. Other markets are suffering from oversupply.

Therefore, more disciplined supply should be the key to returning to profitability for the global poultry industry in 2H 2019. Notable positives are the expected ASF-related strength in pork prices, and the limited feed price upside risks, given the relatively good feed grain supply position expected in...

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Sep 19 10:19 AM, General News


Pork Producers Urge Congress to Ratify USMCA and Support Measures to Prevent Foreign Animal Disease

Congressional ratification of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement (USMCA), allowing the U.S. pork industry to maintain zero-duty market access to two of its largest export markets, remains a top priority for the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC). More than 120 pork producers from across the country helped spread this and other messages on Capitol Hill this week during NPPC’s Fall Legislative Action Conference (LAC).

“Last year, Canada and Mexico took over 40 percent of the pork that was exported from the U.S. and they are expected to be a large percentage this year as well,” said NPPC President David Herring, a pork producer from Lillington, N.C. “USMCA will strengthen...

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Sep 13 8:11 AM, General News


Canada, Mexico and U.S. Plan North American Strategy for African Swine Fever Prevention

Today, the Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) for the United States, Dr. Burke Healey, along with the CVO for Canada, Dr. Jaspinder Komal, and the CVO for Mexico, Dr. Juan Gay Gutierrez, issued the following statement about the 18th North American Animal Health Committee Meeting (NAAHC).

“The NAAHC meets annually to review and plan our countries’ coordinated activities around animal health, which includes our prevention and preparedness efforts for animal health diseases such as avian influenza and foot-and-mouth disease.

This year, we dedicated a special session to discussing African swine fever (ASF), the actions we are taking to prevent its spread to North America, and how to...

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Aug 29 8:17 AM, General News


Retailers Urge Congress to Approve USMCA

The National Retail Federation today urged Congress to take action after its annual August recess to approve the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, which would modernize trade between the three countries and replace the landmark North American Free Trade Agreement.

“This agreement provides significant updates to the North American Free Trade Agreement, which has benefitted U.S. retailers, workers and consumers for the past two decades,” NRF Senior Vice President for Government Relations David French said in a letter sent to Congress. “Ratifying USMCA is key to ensuring continued growth in the North American market.”

Since NAFTA took effect 25 years ago, e-commerce has changed how businesses operate and how consumers purchase goods, but the agreement still lacks provisions relating to...

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Jul 26 8:18 AM, General News


REPORTER: Internal Growth and Export Opportunities in the Mexican Beef Market 

This article was originally featured in the Summer 2019 Edition of Urner Barry's Reporter magazine.
 
 
Mexican beef production continuously increased each month throughout 2018. Last year’s annual beef production totaled 1.98 million metric tons, a 2.8% increase from 2017. Although production has continued to expand...
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Jul 5 8:21 AM, Urner Barry


NAMI Joins More than 950 Groups to Call for Swift Congressional Ratification of the USMCA

The North American Meat Institute today joined more than 950 organizations representing the U.S. food and agriculture industries to urge Members of Congress to swiftly ratify the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

In a letter sent to Congress, more than 950 groups representing the U.S. food and agriculture value chain at the national, state and local levels called on Congress to support the ratification of USMCA. The letter reiterates that USMCA will benefit the U.S. agriculture and food industry while providing consumers a more abundant supply of high-quality, safe food at affordable prices...

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Jun 11 11:58 AM, General News


NPPC Appeal: Let's Move Forward with USMCA, Leave Tariffs at Zero

In response to President Trump’s plan to impose five percent tariffs on all Mexican imports as of June 10, 2019, David Herring, president of the National Pork Producers Council and a pork producer from Lillington, North Carolina, issued the following statement:

“We appeal to President Trump to reconsider plans to open a new trade dispute with Mexico. American pork producers cannot afford retaliatory tariffs from its largest export market, tariffs which Mexico will surely implement. Over the last year, trade disputes with Mexico and China have cost hard-working U.S. pork producers and their families approximately $2.5 billion.

“Let’s move forward with ratification of the United States-Mexico-Canada trade agreement, preserving zero-tariff pork trade in North America for the long term; complete a trade agreement with Japan; and resolve...

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May 31 9:35 AM, General News


Industry Reacts to U.S. Lifting Metal Tariffs on Canada and Mexico 

On Friday, the United States and Canada announced a deal to remove tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum in exchange for keeping dumped metals from China and other countries out of the United States, paving the way for a similar pact with Mexico. The quota-free deal eliminated the U.S. metal tariffs as well as Canada's retaliatory tariffs on about $12 billion worth of U.S. products, including pork and beef. The 25% tariff on steel and 10% tariff on aluminum from Canada and Mexico were a major hurdle to ratification of the new trade deal to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue stated that Congress should swiftly move to ratify the USMCA after the Section 232 Tariffs were removed from Canada and Mexico. "The announcement is a big win for American agriculture and the economy as a whole. I thank President Trump for negotiating a great deal and for negotiating the removal of these tariffs...

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May 21 8:14 AM, Urner Barry


NPPC Statement on Planned Trade Relief Package

The Trump administration today indicated it is planning a trade relief package in response to the U.S. trade dispute with China. The following statement may be attributed to David Herring, a pork producer from Lillington, North Carolina and president of the National Pork Producers Council:

“U.S. pork has suffered from a disproportionate share of retaliation due to trade disputes with Mexico and China. This retaliation turned last year — which analysts had forecast to be profitable — into a very unprofitable time for U.S. pork producers. The financial pain continues...

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May 13 9:29 AM, General News


U.S. Exports for Most Major Meat Commodities Grew in 2018

U.S. exports of beef, pork, and broilers (young chickens) were strong in 2018, driven by domestic production increases and favorable foreign demand. Compared to the previous year, beef exports increased 10.3 percent, pork exports increased 4.2 percent, and broiler exports were 4.1 percent higher than in 2017. Lamb and mutton exports were 1.5 percent lower despite stronger domestic production. Turkey exports declined 1.8 percent, with lower turkey production likely a contributing factor. Egg exports were 6.1 percent lower in 2018 than a year earlier, while production increased 2.1 percent year over year.

The ERS Livestock and Meat International Trade Data product provides monthly and annual data on U.S. meat and livestock exports and imports. The data are broken down by country and commodity and are available for cattle, beef, hogs and pigs, pork, lamb and mutton, broilers, turkeys, and eggs. An analysis of the data helps explain...

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May 2 12:09 PM, General News


Retailers Warn Border Closure would be ‘Self-Inflicted Wound to the American Economy’

The National Retail Federation today sent a letter to Trump administration officials expressing concerns over ongoing threats to close the United States-Mexico border and outlining how a closure would hurt U.S. retailers, workers and consumers.

“We share the administration’s goal of fixing the nation’s broken immigration system and enhancing border security,” NRF President and CEO Matthew Shay said. “However, there is no way to close the U.S-Mexico border without inflicting serious damage to ...

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Apr 4 1:44 PM, General News


U.S. Pork Can't Afford Loss of Mexican Market 

The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) today asked the Trump administration to carefully consider the fallout from cutting off trade between the United States and Mexico. U.S. pork producers and other American farmers are already facing mounting financial losses from retaliatory tariffs by Mexico and China. The following statement may be attributed to David Herring, president of the National Pork Producers Council and a pork producer frim Lillington, North Carolina.

“A cloud of uncertainty and restricted access to our most important export markets have strained U.S. pork producers and their families for more than a year. The value of our exports to Mexico and China are down 28 percent and 32 percent, respectively, this year. We are at the breaking point and cannot afford a total loss of the Mexican market, one that accounted for more than 20 percent of ...

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Apr 2 9:02 AM, General News


USDA Updates Branding Requirements for Mexican Cattle

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is revising branding requirements for cattle imported from Mexico. This change simplifies the branding process, while continuing to ensure Mexican cattle are easily identifiable and traceable for the rest of their lives, in the event of an animal disease detection.

Feeder cattle will be branded with a single “M” on the right hip, and breeding bovines will be branded with a single “M” on the right shoulder. The “M” brand will be larger in size and allow for better readability. An “MX” ear tattoo is still an option for breeder cattle instead of a brand since they have not caused a readability problem and are considered a permanent form of identification. Permanent identification on Mexican cattle is important because they are known to frequently carry ...

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Dec 18 12:05 PM, Urner Barry


U.S. Pork Losses from Trade Dispute with Mexico: $1.5 Billion

Losses Attributed to China Dispute Estimated at $1 Billion

The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) has called for an end to a trade dispute that has cost U.S. pork producers an estimated $1.5 billion this year, according to Iowa State University Economist Dermot Hayes.

“We are very pleased with the new trade agreement with Mexico and Canada, one that preserves zero-tariff pork trade in North America for the long term,” said NPPC President Jim Heimerl, a pork producer from Johnstown, Ohio. “But, it’s imperative that we remove U.S. tariffs on Mexican metal imports so that retaliatory tariffs of 20 percent against U.S. pork are lifted.”

Dr. Hayes estimates that live hog values this year have been reduced by $12 per animal due to retaliatory tariffs imposed by Mexico against U.S. pork in June. The loss estimate of $1.5 billion is based on...

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Dec 3 10:15 AM, General News


USMEF Statement on Developments at G-20 Summit

At the G-20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) was signed and the White House announced that the U.S. and China will enter negotiations on several key trade issues, including agricultural trade.

U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) President and CEO Dan Halstrom issued the following statement:

USMEF supports the Trump administration’s efforts to finalize the USMCA and to continue seeking resolution of the metal tariffs dispute with Mexico and Canada, which resulted in retaliatory duties on U.S. pork and beef. U.S. meat exports have also become... 

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Dec 3 10:09 AM, General News




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