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NPPC Tells Congress Oversight for Gene-Edited Livestock Should Be Under USDA 

Thanks to innovation and continuous improvements, U.S. hog farmers are the world’s leading suppliers of high-quality, safe and affordable pork. However, America is in danger of losing its leadership standing due to significant flaws in its current approach to regulating emerging animal breeding technologies, Iowa Pork Producers President Dr. Michael Paustian testified this morning before the Senate Agriculture Committee. Oversight should be under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), not the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Gene editing technology, which allows for precise changes within an animal’s own genome, offers tremendous promise to combat animal disease while producing safe food in a more sustainable fashion. “Livestock producers need...

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Mar 13 8:26 AM, General News



NPPC: FDA Stall Tactics Hurting U.S. Agriculture

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) misrepresentation of a gene edited livestock research project is its latest stall tactic designed to rationalize a regulatory grasp on an emerging technology that must be regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) if the United States is to maintain its global leadership position in agriculture.

“While countries like China, Canada, Brazil and Argentina are moving quickly on this advancement to gain competitive advantage, the United States is falling far behind because of the FDA’s precautionary regulatory approach,” said NPPC President David Herring, a hog farmer from Lillington, N.C. “Under FDA regulation, gene editing faces an impractical, lengthy and expensive approval process. Unless we move oversight to the USDA, we are ceding a technology that promises significant animal health benefits, including...

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Feb 12 8:13 AM, General News


NCBA Releases Consumer Research Showing Widespread Confusion About Contents of Plant-Based Fake Meat

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) today released survey results that show widespread consumer confusion regarding the ingredient composition and purported benefits of plant-based fake meat products.

In an online survey of more than 1,800 consumers, less than half of the respondents understood the labeling term “plant-based beef” was intended to describe an entirely vegetarian or vegan food product. One major source of confusion uncovered by NCBA’s research is that approximately one third of surveyed consumers believed that plant-based fake meat products contained at least some real beef in them. When asked to evaluate specific product labels and marketing materials from some of the leading plant-based fake beef products currently on the market, the results were astonishing...

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Feb 10 8:13 AM, General News


Ohio Man Sentenced for Intentionally Selling Sick, Adulterated Calves for Human Consumption

On September 26, 2019, Cory Gillette, a cattle hauler and dealer, of Albany, Ohio, was sentenced to 5 years of probation, a $1,000 fine and 150 hours of community service for introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce and for making false statements to federal investigators. Gillette pleaded guilty to those charges in January.

According to charges filed in the United States District Court in the Southern District of Ohio, Western Division, Mr. Gillette presented cattle to slaughterhouses that tested positive for Gentamicin, a new animal drug that is a medically important antimicrobial prohibited in food intended for human consumption and not approved for use in cattle.

Under federal law, food is deemed to be adulterated if it contains a new animal drug that is unsafe for its intended use, as determined by approved conditions for...

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Oct 3 12:09 PM, General News


National Turkey Federation Testifies on Capitol Hill 

Today, Ron Kardel, Vice Chairman of the National Turkey Federation, testified before the Senate Agriculture Committee on Capitol Hill. Kardel updated the Committee on the state of the turkey industry, including topics such as exports, disease prevention and response, immigration, and research concerns. Kardel began with thanking the Committee for the opportunity, informing those at the hearing that there were more than 244 million turkeys raised in the United States last year. Kardel added that the USDA projects 5.8 billion pounds of turkey production to take place this year. The turkey industry generates 441,000 jobs, and in order to support these jobs, Kardel explained that policies coming out of Washington must maintain America's ability to thrive. Kardel spoke on behalf of the turkey industry when he expressed the anticipation of working with Congress and the Committee to address these issues.

Kardel mentioned the importance of exports to the turkey industry, stating that expanded trade would lead to significant growth and reducing uncertainty is imperative. Therefore, Kardel strongly urged Congress to pass the USMCA this fall, as this should not be a partisan issue. Kardel mentioned that the turkey industry has a fantastic relationship with...

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Sep 25 11:35 AM, Urner Barry


USPOULTRY Releases Report of Antimicrobial Use Across U.S. Broiler Chickens and Turkeys

U.S. Poultry & Egg Association announced last week the release of the U.S. poultry industry’s first-ever report quantifying antimicrobial use on broiler chicken and turkey farms. The new report shows dramatic reductions of turkey and broiler chicken antimicrobial use over a five-year timeframe. As part of its commitment to the transparency and sustainability of a safe food supply, the poultry industry aims to strike a balance between keeping poultry flocks healthy and the responsible use of antimicrobials, especially those medically important to human health.

Under the research direction of Dr. Randall Singer, DVM, PhD, of Mindwalk Consulting Group, LLC, this report represents a five-year set of data collected from 2013 to 2017 regarding the use of antimicrobials in U.S. broiler chickens and turkeys throughout their lifetime, from hatchery to day of harvest. It was prepared through a systematic collection of on-farm antimicrobial use data to capture the...

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Aug 12 11:26 AM, General News


Outbreak of Drug Resistant Salmonella Linked to Contact with Pig Ear Dog Treats 

The CDC and FDA are advising consumers not to buy or feed pig ear dog treats to pets, including any that may already be in homes. People may contract Salmonella after handling the treats or caring for dogs that have eaten the pig ears. Dogs may also become sick after consumption. A total of 127 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella have been reported from 33 states. While 26 people have been hospitalized, no deaths have been reported. About 21% of reported illnesses are among children younger than the age of 5.

Laboratory and traceback evidence indicated that contact with pig ear dog treats from many different suppliers is likely the source of the Salmonella outbreak. State health and regulatory officials in several states along with...

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Aug 2 9:41 AM, Urner Barry


FDA Authorizes Soy Leghemoglobin as a Color Additive

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the color additive regulations to provide for the safe use of soy leghemoglobin as a color additive in ground beef analogue products (e.g., “veggie” burgers). The FDA is taking this action in response to a color additive petition submitted by Impossible Foods, Inc. requesting FDA to issue a regulation listing the use of soy leghemoglobin as a color additive in food.

This final rule is in response to a color additive petition submitted by Impossible Foods, Inc., filed on November 5, 2018. The FDA reviewed the information and data submitted by the firm, as well as other relevant information, and concluded...

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Aug 1 9:06 AM, General News


National Pork Producers Council Launches 'Keep America First In Agriculture' Campaign

Today, the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) launched “Keep America First in Agriculture,” a new campaign to highlight the importance of establishing a proper regulatory framework for gene editing in American livestock.

Gene editing technology, which introduces useful genetic variation into food animal breeding programs, promises significant animal health benefits, including a natural immunity to disease and a reduction in the need for antibiotic use.

“Gene editing is a huge step forward for America’s farmers, as it offers a powerful new way to combat animal disease..."

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Jun 26 9:38 AM, General News


NPPC Supports Executive Order to Keep America First in Agriculture 

Based on recommendations by the administration’s Rural Development Taskforce, President Trump today signed an executive order to streamline regulations for agriculture biotechnology, a development welcomed by the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC).

“Agriculture is one of the crown jewels of the U.S. economy,” said David Herring, NPPC president and a pork producer from Lillington, North Carolina. “Today’s executive order paves the way for common sense regulation to keep America first in agriculture so that we remain the global leader in an economic sector that has offset the U.S. trade imbalance for decades and that is so critical for the prosperity of our rural communities.”

The executive order (EO) provides a framework to support leadership in emerging technologies such as gene editing for livestock, an innovation that promises to eliminate costly diseases that...

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Jun 12 9:19 AM, General News


Developing Alternatives to Antibiotics Used in Food Animal Production

Antibiotics are a lifesaving technology widely used in human and veterinary medicine. However, the use of antibiotic drugs, by humans or animals, can also create selective evolutionary pressures that can spawn microbes and genes resistant to the drugs. Antimicrobial resistance has become a global human health concern, with widespread public and private initiatives aimed at managing resistance. Livestock agriculture is a major consumer of antibiotics and, thus, a contributor to antibiotic resistance.

As the agricultural use of antibiotics becomes a greater focus of policymakers and consumers, animal pharma—the industry that develops and markets antibiotics for food animal use—is altering its outlook on developing as well as investing in new antibiotic products. Rising awareness of antibiotic resistance has generated a number of effects, including regulations on the use of...

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May 31 11:38 AM, General News


USDA Releases Baseline Data on Antimicrobial Use by Beef and Swine Operations

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is releasing the results of two national studies that examine antimicrobial use and stewardship on beef feedlots and on large swine operations during 2016.

The data USDA collected and studied will help animal health officials – as well as the human health community and consumers – better understand how antimicrobial drugs are used on livestock farms. The studies include details on what antimicrobials were used, why they were used and how they were administered...

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May 23 3:59 PM, General News


Cargill Conducts Voluntary Recall of Select Southern States Feed Due to High, Excessive, or Elevated Aflatoxin Levels

Cargill’s animal nutrition business is conducting a voluntary recall of select Southern States® feed due to aflatoxin levels that exceed FDA’s action levels. The affected products, which were manufactured and sold in the eastern United States, were removed from retail shelves throughout February, March, and April 2019. Livestock, horses, and poultry exposed to aflatoxin are at risk of exposure to several health hazards.

Aflatoxicosis has the same acute and chronic adverse effects and health consequences across all species and age classes (immature and mature). Immature animals are more sensitive to aflatoxins. Acute aflatoxicosis may result in generalized hemorrhage, bloody diarrhea and death in 1-3 days. In addition, aflatoxin toxicity can cause reduced feed intake, reduced weight gain, liver damage, jaundice, and...

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May 8 10:26 AM, General News


Market of Choice, Inc. Recalls Pork and Poultry Products 

Market of Choice, Inc., an Eugene, Ore. establishment, is recalling approximately 1,094 pounds of pork and poultry pâté products due to misbranding and undeclared allergens, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products contain milk and soy, known allergens, which are not declared on the product label.

The pork and poultry pâté items were produced on various dates prior to March 26, 2019. The products have a 30-day shelf life. The following products are subject to recall ...

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Apr 1 8:32 AM, General News




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